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New SUPRAs at NIAS.

Eija Niskanen, PhD, Department of World CulturesUniversity of Helsinki.

Moomin’s adventures in the Land of the Rising Sun – Adaptation and originality in content industry

Eija Niskanen is writing her PhD thesis at University of Helsinki on the topic Moomins’ Adventures in the Land of the Rising Sun – Adaptation and originality of Japanese anime based on European original concept. The research is about the two Japanese animated television series based on Tove Jansson's Moomin concept, Mumin (ムーミン 、1969-72) and Tales from the Moomin Valley (楽しいムーミン一家、1990-92), and studies the two animations against the background of Japanese anime industry in respective times. The two adaptations differ in terms of faithfullness to the original stories, but also in the production model, with the first being a Japanese production, and the latter a Japanese- Dutch-Finnish co-production. Moomins are also a notable feature in the country image of Finland (Nye's soft power) in Japan. 

 

 

 

Farhana Nasrin, MA, Department of Gender Studies, Lund University.

Beyond the Crisis of Identity: The Case of Rohingya Refugee’s Plight through Gendered Glasses

Farhana Nasrin is pursuing her second master’s degree at the Department of Gender Studies at Lund University in Sweden. She completed her bachelor’s in mass communication from University of Liberal Arts Bangladesh (ULAB) and master’s in Development Studies from BRAC University, Dhaka, Bangladesh. She has six years of professional working experience in different international non-governmental organizations (INGO’s), role played as intern, research assistant, Program officer (implementation and monitoring) in Bangladesh. She is a recipient of the prestigious Swedish Institute Study Scholarship (SISS) in 2017.

She is writing her master’s thesis on ‘‘Beyond the Crisis of Identity: The Case of Rohingya Refugee’s Plight through Gendered Glasses’’. She has keen research interest on human rights, refugees, stateless people, gender inequalities, violence and everyday discrimination in South/Southeast Asia, with special interest on contemporary Rohingya genocide with reference to Rohingya women and girls, in and around the diaspora. For her master’s thesis, she is inspired by the feminist intersectionality theory and the concept of ‘subaltern’ by Spivak and will be exploring the case of Rohingya refugee crisis in 2017.