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Workshop: Studying Chinese Politics with Professor David Shambaugh

Date: 
Thursday, December 13, 2018 - 10:30 to 11:30

Abstract:
How has the field of study of Chinese politics evolved in the West during the seventy years of the People’s Republic of China? In this lecture/discussion Professor Shambaugh will describe six “generations” of academic scholarship in the West (mainly USA), the main emphases of each generation, the principal paradigms that have been in “vogue,” the primary sources each had access to and how they shaped analysis, impediments to research and understanding, the professional factors that have affected the field and China-watching, and the future evolution of the field.

Bio:
David Shambaugh is Gaston Sigur Professor of Asian Studies, Political Science, and International Affairs at the George Washington University, where he also directs the China Policy Program in the Elliott School of International Affairs. He is an internationally recognized authority on China’s domestic politics, foreign policy, military and security, and the international relations of Asia. He is the former Editor of The China Quarterly, a frequent commentator in the international media, a consultant to the U.S. Government and private foundations, and the author of numerous books, chapters, and articles on different aspects of China and Asian affairs. His most recent books (2016) are China’s Future and The China Reader: Rising Power.

Time: 13th of December 2018, 10:30-11:30
Place: NIAS, room 18.1.08, CSS, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5, 1353 Cph

Registration: Participation is free, and no registration is needed for this event.

Organizers: ThinkChina.dk and NIAS
 

Lunchtalk: Predicting China with David Shambaugh

Date: 
Thursday, December 13, 2018 - 12:00 to 13:30

Abstract:
In this luncheon discussion, Professor Shambaugh will lead off with a brief summary of his last book China’s Future  (2016). He will describe the main arguments of that study and assess the degree of continuity and change in China since it was published. The discussion will then turn to identifying the main variables shaping China’s evolution today and into the medium-term future.

Bio:
David Shambaugh is Gaston Sigur Professor of Asian Studies, Political Science, and International Affairs at the George Washington University, where he also directs the China Policy Program in the Elliott School of International Affairs. He is an internationally recognized authority on China’s domestic politics, foreign policy, military and security, and the international relations of Asia. He is the former Editor of The China Quarterly, a frequent commentator in the international media, a consultant to the U.S. Government and private foundations, and the author of numerous books, chapters, and articles on different aspects of China and Asian affairs. His most recent books (2016) are China’s Future and The China Reader: Rising Power.

Time: 13th of December 2018, 12:00-13:30
Place: NIAS, room 18.1.08, CSS, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5, 1353 Cph

Registration: Participation is free, and no registration is needed for this event.

Organizers: ThinkChina.dk and NIAS
 

Facing the Challenges of Ethical Communication Across Differences in Disciplines, Cultures and Class: The Case of Bile Duct Cancer in the Mekhong Delta.

Date: 
Friday, December 14, 2018 - 12:30 to 13:30

Lunch talk by Rachel Harrison, Professor, SOAS

Abstract
Bile duct cancer (cholangiocarcinoma, abbreviated to CCA) is a rare disease in most parts of the world; but in the Mekhong delta areas of mainland South East Asia its high prevalence comes from chronic liver fluke infection. Medical evidence suggests that fluke infestation deriving from the centuries-old cultural tradition of eating raw, partially cooked or fermented river fish results in chronic bile duct inflammation leading to cancer in c.1-4% of cases. In Thailand this translates to around 20,000 deaths per year, with an estimated similar number in Lao PDR. The slow development of CCA remains asymptomatic until the later stages of the disease, as a result of which few can be effectively treated. It is also largely a disease of the poor and of rural communities who have little access to healthcare.
    CCA frustrates medical specialists because the eradication of OV infection would prevent most cases altogether, hence saving thousands from dying a painful death. From their perspective, if only people would stop consuming raw fish, then the cancer rates would drop drastically. The complexity of the problem is not, however, solely a medical one. Much more, it is one that clearly requires a respectful and ethical engagement across disciplines and between people, recognizing our subjectivity as humans. The problem of CCA calls for interdisciplinary collaboration between medicine, the social sciences and the humanities – between the fields of public health and hygiene, epidemiology, parasitology, biochemistry, religious and spiritual belief patterns, history, geography, anthropology ecology, psychology, phenomenology, socio- linguistics, postcolonial theory, literature, the arts and cultural studies). But it also calls yet more urgently for an openness to dialogue and a willingness to listen to the Other. Decades of top-down public healthcare in Thailand have located the needs and cultural practices of rural rice-farming communities as irrelevant and symptomatic of a lack of “civilization”. And Bangkok-centric views of the regions affected by this disease can “classify” them almost sub-human. Only by fully and respectfully engaging with the grassroots populations that are most vulnerable to this disease – and to many others – can we make an ethical contribution to intervention.

Biography
Rachel Harrison is Professor of Thai Cultural Studies at the School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics at SOAS, University of London. She has published widely on issues of gender, and sexuality, modern literature and cinema in Thailand as well as the comparative literature of South East Asia. In addition to her co-edited volume (with Peter A. Jackson) on The Ambiguous Allure of the West (2010), she has edited a volume of chapters by Thai authors on the question of Western theoretical approaches to Thai literary analysis, entitled Disturbing Conventions: Decentring Thai Literary Cultures (Rowman and Littlefield International, 2014). In 2017 she published an interdisciplinary paper with the journal Feminist Review, entitled 'Dystopia as Liberation: Disturbing Femininities in Contemporary Thailand'.

She is currently working on an AHRC-funded research project in culture, wellbeing and public health relating to diet and disease in Northeast Thailand, Laos and Cambodia. She is also editor of the quarterly journal South East Asia Research and Chair of the Centre for South East Asian Studies at SOAS.
 

Time: 14 December 2018, 12:30-13:30
Place: NIAS meeting room, 18.1.08, CSS, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5, 1353 Cph

Organized by NIAS & ADI

All are welcome

Lunch Talk: Which Incentives Lie behind the CCPs Shift in Climate Policy?

Date: 
Monday, December 17, 2018 - 12:30 to 13:00

Abstract: 
Today, China occupies the world’s largest renewable energy sectors; it has implemented a vision to strive for an “ecological civilization” and is perceived as a leader in international negotiations. However, the political incentives behind the Chineese Communist Parties (CCPs) policy shift stand out as an empirical puzzle. It contradicts traditional policy priorities to secure social stability through economic growth, it is inconsistent with CCPs historical priorities and it contradicts its position in letting industrialized countries lead climate change mitigation. Therefore my thesis examines: Which incentives lie behind the CCPs shift in climate policy?

To answer this question, I test the three different political incentives: 1) an incentive to reduce a bottom-up pressure from civil society such as climate demonstrations 2) an incentive to promote economic and technological development by deploying a long-term industrial policy and 3) an incentive to improve Chinas foreign policy position in the international system by deploying an atractiveness climate policy. The theories are tested through hypothesis on the CCP’s main climate policy papers, expert interviews and through statistical databases.

Bio:
The author of the thesis is Mark Søndergaard have just finished his thesis in political science at Aarhus University. As part of his study, he went to Tokyo to study Global Environmental Study. Beside his studies he has worked for the United Nations Development Programme and as an environmental consultant at NIRAS.

The lunch talk will be moderated by Lau Øfjord Blaxekjær, Post Doc Researcher at NIAS.

 

All are welcome, but bring your own lunch!

 

Time: 17 December 12:30-13:00
Venue: NIAS, meeting room 18.1.08, Øster Farimagsgade 5, 1353 CphPosPost Doc Researchert Doc Researcher